James Ocholi: FG donates house to late minster’s family

The Minister of  State for Labour and Employment, James Ocholi (SAN),

The donation was made by the Secretary to the Government of the Federation (SGF), Mr Boss Mustapha.

The Federal Government on Thursday redeemed its pledge to donate a house to the family of late Minister of State for Labour and Employment, Mr James Ocholi.

The donation was made by the Secretary to the Government of the Federation (SGF), Mr Boss Mustapha.

Mustapha, represented by Mr Olusegun Adekunle, the Permanent Secretary, General Services Office, said the presentation was to fulfill one of the promises government made to the surviving children of late Ocholi.

According to him, “It is a promise kept”. He said that the government made three promises to the family during the burial ceremony namely; scholarship for children in school, employment for the graduates and acquisition of a befitting house in Abuja.

He said that he promises were made by the president in recognition of the diligent service to the country by the late minister.

He said that the house “is a four- bedroom terrace house in Flower Gate Estate, along Apo Resettlement, Abuja.’’

Receiving the document of the property on behalf of the family, Mr Aaron Ocholi, son of the late minister, commended the government for keeping to its promise.

The News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports Mr James Ocholi died in March 2016 with his wife and son on the Abuja-Kaduna express way in a ghastly accident.

The presentation of the house documents was made in the Office of the Secretary to the Government of the Federation (OSGF) not at the location of the house.

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Tech: Amazon made a $30 wall clock with its Alexa assistant built in (AMZN)

amazon echo wall clock

Time to get an Amazon Alexa-powered wall clock?

What time is it? Maybe time to get a new wall clock, powered by Amazon's Alexa virtual assistant.

The wall clock, somewhat unimaginatively called the Echo Clock, is Alexa-enabled and is capable of setting multiple timers at once. The clock is analog, but it has a built-in motor, so it's capable of updating the time on its own during Daylight Savings.

The clock will cost $30 and is available for pre-order starting Thursday. Amazon says it'll be available later this year.

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Finance: Millennials are snapping up the 'Tesla of China' since its IPO (NIO)

Nio, the Tesla of China, has millennial investors pilling into the stock after its US initial public offering since week.

Millennial investors have been pilling into Nio, the Tesla of China, shares since its US initial public offering last week.

  • Millennial investors have been pilling into Nio, the Tesla of China, shares since its US initial public offering last week.
  • Nio shares have gained 46% since their IPO, and is the 29th most held stock on Robinhood.
  • Watch Nio trade in real time here.

Nio — the Tencent-backed electric-car startup widely seen as the Tesla of China — has become a darling for investors on the stock-trading app Robinhood, a no-fee brokerage popular among younger traders.

Shares have gained 46% since their US initial public offering last week, and are now held by 46,971 Robinhood investors, the site’s data shows, making it the 29th most held stock.

To give some content, another popular Chinese tech stock, iQiyi, referred to as the Netflix of China and currently the 31th most popular stock on the brokerage, first appeared in the top 100 in late May — two months after it was listed on US markets.

Nio priced at $6.26 a share, the low end of its range, and failed to raise the $1.8 billion it sought. But, one day after its lackluster debut, the stock soared 75%, shrugging off an "underperform" rating by Bernstein analyst Robin Zhu.

More recently, Nio, like many Chinese tech stocks that are listed in the US markets, came under pressure amid the recent tit-and-tat tariff retaliations between the US and China .

Nio, originally named NextCar, was founded by William Li in November 2014, and changed its name in July 2017.

According to Evercore ISI's Arndt Ellinghorst, China could have 4 million electric vehicles in 2023, with Nio likely grabbing around 13% of total market share and 42% of the mid- and premium- electric market. That'll cause its revenue to double that time, he said.

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Politics: A solid majority of Massachusetts voters don't want Elizabeth Warren to run for president in 2020

Elizabeth Warren

Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts has for months topped lists of Democrats angling to challenge President Donald Trump the in 2020 election, but new polling has found that a solid majority of her constituents don't want her to seek the Democratic nomination.

  • New polling has found that a solid majority of Sen. Elizabeth Warren's constituents don't want her to seek the Democratic nomination for president in 2020.
  • Fifty-eight percent of Massachusetts voters said they hope Warren doesn't run, despite the fact that a nearly identical percentage — 57% — view her favorably.
  • But Warren, who says she is focused on winning reelection this November, regularly tops lists of likely 2020 contenders.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts has for months topped lists of Democrats angling to challenge Donald Trump for the presidency in 2020, but new polling has found that a solid majority of her constituents don't want her to seek the Democratic nomination.

Fifty-eight percent of Massachusetts voters said they hope Warren doesn't run, despite the fact that nearly an identical percentage — 57% — view her favorably.

Just 32% of the 500 voters surveyed in the Suffolk University/Boston Globe poll said Warren should run.

"This was a shocking finding to me, given that Democrats like her so much, and she has been making moves to run for president. I would have expected her to be leading this list of potential Massachusetts presidential candidates," David Paleologos, the director of the poll, told the Boston Globe.

Globe reporter James Pindell noted the "common thread" among 15 polled voters he spoke with was that Democratic voters, including women, "love Warren but worry she isn't electable and they don't want to take chances when it comes to beating Trump."

Meanwhile, a larger segment of voters — 38% — said their state's former Democratic governor, Deval Patrick, should join the race. Patrick doesn't appear on many national lists of potential 2020 contenders.

The Republican party quickly seized on the poll results, pushing out an email titled "not #WithHer."

"She's running. But the people who know her best don't want her to," Republican National Committee's rapid response director Michael Ahrens wrote, concluding with Warren's own catchphrase, "Nevertheless, she persisted."

The poll surveyed 500 voters between September 13-17 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.4 percentage points.

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Tech: Amazon is releasing four new products to make your stereo system way smarter — including a subwoofer

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Amazon just announced the Echo Input, Echo Link, Echo Link Amp, and the Echo Sub.

  • Amazon just announced the addition of four new audio products in its Echo lineup.
  • The Echo Input gives you Alexa control by connecting to a non-echo speaker through an auxiliary cord or bluetooth.
  • The Echo Link connects to a receiver or amplifier, and lets you control music selection, volume, and multi-room playback through Alexa.
  • The Echo Link Amp has the same functionality of the Link, but includes a built-in amplifier.
  • The Echo Sub adds a subwoofer to the Echo lineup, and can be paired with two Echos for a 2.1 stereo sound system.

Amazon just announced four new audio products meant to enhance the home listening experience of Echo and Alexa users.

First up is the $129.99 Echo Sub, a subwoofer that will give some extra bass to an Echo speaker system and can be paired with two Echos to create a 2.1 stereo speaker setup.

The $199 Echo Link connects to a receiver or amplifier through digital or analog inputs, and lets you control music selection, volume, and multi-room playback through Alexa. The $299.99 Echo Link Amp has the same functionality as the Link, but has a built-in 60W 2-channel amplifier.

For those with non-Amazon or non-Alexa compatible speakers, the $34.99 Echo Input gives you Alexa control over non-Echo speakers — it can be connected to any speaker through Bluetooth or an auxiliary cable, allowing you to use voice commands with the device.

Before the Amazon devices event kicked off, two of Amazon's new products seemed to be accidentally leaked by Amazon on its website — The Echo Sub and the Amazon Smart Plug were listed on Amazon's store earlier in the day.

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Tech: Amazon is making a $25 smart plug that can make almost anything in your house 'smart' (AMZN)

Amazon Echo Smart Plug

Amazon's new Smart Plug can make it easier and cheaper than ever to smart-ify your home.

Amazon on Thursday unveiled a new device that could turn almost any device in your house into a "smart" device.

Called the Amazon Smart Plug, the new device will plug into an outlet. You can then plug in devices like lamps, and control them using your voice. It sounds similar to competing products made by a who's who of outside electronics manufacturers, including TP-Link and Belkin.

The Smart Plug will cost $24.99 and be available for preorder starting Thursday. The device will start shipping next month.

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Tech: Amazon just unveiled a brand-new $150 Echo Plus

amazon echo plus

Amazon is giving its premium Echo speaker, the Echo Plus, a major update.

  • Amazon announced a range of new products and product updates to its Alexa-powered hardware line-up on Thursday.
  • Among them, Amazon unveiled an updated Echo Plus — the largest, most premium version of its smart speakers.
  • The new Echo Plus costs the same $150 as the previous version, and is available for pre-order imminently.

Amazon just introduced a brand-new Echo Plus.

The new device, which is an update to the device that debuted last year, was unveiled at an event at its headquarters in Seattle on Thursday.

The new Echo Plus will serve as a smart home hub, just like last year's version, and will have a new feature called local voice control — what that means is the device will still work when the internet goes down.

Echo Plus will cost $149.99 and will be available to preorder starting Thursday.

Developing

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Beyonce’s former drummer claims she’s been using “extreme witchcraft” to control her and she wants a restraining order (photos)

Beyonce's former drummer, Kimberly Thompson, is accusing the singer of a number of things, including using witchcraft on her and killing her cat. She's now requested for a restraining order against the singer. Kimberly, who was Beyonce's drummer for 7 years, claims the mother-of-three has wrapped her up in practices of "extreme witchcraft" and has been using her spells to control her finances and keep her on surveillance, The Blast reports.  The documents filed by Kimberly state how she believes Beyonce has started a harassment campaign against her filled with "extreme witchcraft, dark magic” and “magic spells of sexual molestation.” Kimberley even claims that Beyonce murdered her kitten.  According to the very bizarre court documents obtained by The Blast, Kimberly Thompson says:I worked for her as her drummer for her band for 7 years. Kimberly also believes Beyoncé has been taping her phones and controlling her finances. The post Beyonce’s former drummer claims she’s been using extreme witchcraft to control her and she wants a restraining order (photos) appeared first on Linda Ikeji Blog.
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Strategy: Mattress Firm says its own former executives accepted private-jet trips, expensive watches, and luxurious hotel stays from brokers in exchange for opening so many new stores it spurred conspiracy theories

There's a high concentration of Mattress Firm stores in Atlanta.

Mattress Firm filed a lawsuit against two of its employees, a broker, and a group of developers claiming that they conspired to push the company to aggressively expand.

  • Mattress Firm is frequently accused of having too many stores in the United States. But there may be more to that story than first meets the eye.
  • In October 2017, Mattress Firm filed a lawsuit against two of its former employees, a broker, and a group of developers, claiming that they conspired to push the company to aggressively expand.
  • Mattress Firm alleges that the two former employees received kickbacks and bribes in exchange for business to "financially enrich" themselves at the company's expense.
  • All defendants have denied the allegations. The broker named in the suit, Alexander Deitch, filed a countersuit against Mattress Firm, arguing that it was the company's aggressive store expansion and desire to remove all competition from the market that led it to open these stores.
  • To hear the full story, listen to Business Insider's new podcast, "Household Name."

In January, a Reddit thread claiming that Mattress Firm is a money-laundering operation went viral, sending the internet into a frenzy as people posted screenshots from Google Maps showing the heavy concentration of stores in their area.

With about 3,400 stores, Mattress Firm is by far the largest specialty mattress retailer in the United States. In fact, it's not uncommon to find many of its stores right across the road from each other. Redditors argued that this was far too many given that Mattress Firm sells a product that is typically bought every seven to 10 years.

"Mattress Firm is some sort of giant money laundering scheme," a Reddit user wrote, adding, "I remember seeing 4 mattress firms all on each corner of an intersection once, and there is no way there is such a demand for mattresses."

At the time, Mattress Firm denied any wrongdoing to Business Insider.

"The idea that the proximity of Mattress Firm store locations is related to money laundering or any illegal activity is absolutely false," former CEO Ken Murphy told Business Insider in a statement shortly after. "Our convenient locations in highly-trafficked areas keep us top of mind when it's time to buy a mattress."

While these money-laundering allegations may well be unfounded, there is an unexpected twist to the story.

Big expansion plans

In October 2017, Mattress Firm filed a lawsuit against two of its former in-house real estate executives, an external broker, and a group of developers, accusing them of conspiring to make Mattress Firm aggressively expand, open stores in expensive locations, and sign leases above market rates.

Mattress Firm claims in the lawsuit that the two former employees were receiving kickbacks and bribes from the broker and developers in exchange for business to "financially enrich" themselves at the company's expense. It describes the arrangement as a "nationwide bribery, kickback, and fraud scheme."

The two former executives, Bruce Levy and Ryan Vinson, were hired by Mattress Firm in 2009 and 2010, respectively, to run the company's store growth strategy.

According to the company's lawsuit, Levy and Vinson encouraged Mattress Firm to hire Alexander Deitch, a broker at Colliers International Atlanta, to become its master broker and to be responsible for identifying, evaluating, and brokering new site locations.

These parties were responsible for recommending which stores to open, which leases to sign, what the terms of those leases should be, which construction budgets to approve, which store leases to renew, and which stores to close, court filings say. 1,500 stores were opened during this time, and hundreds more had their leases renewed.

A spokesperson for Colliers declined to comment to Business Insider.

The lawsuit alleges that Deitch gave bribes such as expensive watches, cash, and trips around the world to Levy and Vinson in order to maintain his relationship as their broker. According to the lawsuit, Levy allowed Deitch to personally profit from the expansion by secretly owning stores leased to Mattress Firm, charging developers "phony fees," which drove rental prices up.

Developers were also in on the scheme, Mattress Firm said. Those who provided kickbacks and bribes, such as private-jet and chartered-yacht trips as well as stays in expensive hotels, were given long lease terms and received market rents.

Levy and Vinson were fired by Mattress Firm in 2016, according to the company's lawsuit.

'Mattress Firm weaponized its real estate department to crush opponents'

All of the defendants denied the allegations, and in March 2018, Alexander Deitch filed a countersuit.

Deitch's countersuit argues that Mattress Firm's management team, including former CEO Ken Murphy and current CEO Steve Stagner, not only knew about these deals but were encouraging them. According to Deitch's suit, this was all part of the company's plan to dominate the market and wipe out all competition. Mattress Firm's strategy was to have one store per 80,000 people to garner 40% of the market, the countersuit says.

According to Deitch's countersuit, "Mattress Firm weaponized its real estate department to crush opponents," and its "aggressive roll-up was reckless, resulting in massive clustering of stores."

Moreover, Deitch argues that bribery and gift-giving were part of the company's culture.

"From the top down, it was ingrained in Mattress Firm's culture that its executives and employees could (and should) receive gifts and trips," court filings read.

Deitch's suit also points to the practices of Mattress Firm's parent company, South African retail conglomerate Steinhoff, which bought Mattress Firm at a premium for $3.8 billion in 2016 and is currently the subject of a criminal investigation.

Toward the end of 2017, Steinhoff's stock price tanked by as much as 62% in one day, wiping out $15 billion of its market value after it postponed publishing its full-year accounts, citing "accounting irregularities." Two top executives and its chairman have resigned, and it is now being investigated for fraud.

"The collapse of Steinhoff's value put tremendous pressure on Mattress Firm to seek other avenues than productivity to shore-up its revenues," the countersuit reads.

Steinhoff would not comment on its relationship to Mattress Firm or why it bought the company at a premium.

"As a result of the ongoing investigation, the group has taken a decision not to comment on any past transactions or relationships until we have the results of the forensic investigation," a spokesperson for the company said in a statement emailed to Business Insider.

To hear more about the conspiracy theories around Mattress Firm's stores, listen to "Household Name," a new podcast from Business Insider. Subscribe for free on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or your favorite app.

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Strategy: Mattress Firm claims in a lawsuit that its own former executives accepted private-jet trips, expensive watches, and luxurious hotel stays from brokers in exchange for opening so many new stores it spurred conspiracy theories

There's a high concentration of Mattress Firm stores in Atlanta.

Mattress Firm filed a lawsuit against two of its employees, a broker, and a group of developers claiming that they conspired to push the company to aggressively expand.

  • Mattress Firm is frequently accused of having too many stores in the United States. But there may be more to that story than first meets the eye.
  • In October 2017, Mattress Firm filed a lawsuit against two of its former employees, a broker, and a group of developers, claiming that they conspired to push the company to aggressively expand.
  • Mattress Firm alleges that the two former employees received kickbacks and bribes in exchange for business to "financially enrich" themselves at the company's expense.
  • All defendants have denied the allegations. The broker named in the suit, Alexander Deitch, filed a countersuit against Mattress Firm, arguing that it was the company's aggressive store expansion and desire to remove all competition from the market that led it to open these stores.
  • To hear the full story, listen to Business Insider's new podcast, "Household Name."

In January, a Reddit thread claiming that Mattress Firm is a money-laundering operation went viral, sending the internet into a frenzy as people posted screenshots from Google Maps showing the heavy concentration of stores in their area.

With about 3,400 stores, Mattress Firm is by far the largest specialty mattress retailer in the United States. In fact, it's not uncommon to find many of its stores right across the road from each other. Redditors argued that this was far too many given that Mattress Firm sells a product that is typically bought every seven to 10 years.

"Mattress Firm is some sort of giant money laundering scheme," a Reddit user wrote, adding, "I remember seeing 4 mattress firms all on each corner of an intersection once, and there is no way there is such a demand for mattresses."

At the time, Mattress Firm denied any wrongdoing to Business Insider.

"The idea that the proximity of Mattress Firm store locations is related to money laundering or any illegal activity is absolutely false," former CEO Ken Murphy told Business Insider in a statement shortly after. "Our convenient locations in highly-trafficked areas keep us top of mind when it's time to buy a mattress."

While these money-laundering allegations may well be unfounded, there is an unexpected twist to the story.

Big expansion plans

In October 2017, Mattress Firm filed a lawsuit against two of its former in-house real estate executives, an external broker, and a group of developers, accusing them of conspiring to make Mattress Firm aggressively expand, open stores in expensive locations, and sign leases above market rates.

Mattress Firm claims in the lawsuit that the two former employees were receiving kickbacks and bribes from the broker and developers in exchange for business to "financially enrich" themselves at the company's expense. It describes the arrangement as a "nationwide bribery, kickback, and fraud scheme."

The two former executives, Bruce Levy and Ryan Vinson, were hired by Mattress Firm in 2009 and 2010, respectively, to run the company's store growth strategy.

According to the company's lawsuit, Levy and Vinson encouraged Mattress Firm to hire Alexander Deitch, a broker at Colliers International Atlanta, to become its master broker and to be responsible for identifying, evaluating, and brokering new site locations.

These parties were responsible for recommending which stores to open, which leases to sign, what the terms of those leases should be, which construction budgets to approve, which store leases to renew, and which stores to close, court filings say. 1,500 stores were opened during this time, and hundreds more had their leases renewed.

A spokesperson for Colliers declined to comment to Business Insider.

The lawsuit alleges that Deitch gave bribes such as expensive watches, cash, and trips around the world to Levy and Vinson in order to maintain his relationship as their broker. According to the lawsuit, Levy allowed Deitch to personally profit from the expansion by secretly owning stores leased to Mattress Firm, charging developers "phony fees," which drove rental prices up.

Developers were also in on the scheme, Mattress Firm said. Those who provided kickbacks and bribes, such as private-jet and chartered-yacht trips as well as stays in expensive hotels, were given long lease terms and received market rents.

Levy and Vinson were fired by Mattress Firm in 2016, according to the company's lawsuit.

'Mattress Firm weaponized its real estate department to crush opponents'

All of the defendants denied the allegations, and in March 2018, Alexander Deitch filed a countersuit.

Deitch's countersuit argues that Mattress Firm's management team, including former CEO Ken Murphy and current CEO Steve Stagner, not only knew about these deals but were encouraging them. According to Deitch's suit, this was all part of the company's plan to dominate the market and wipe out all competition. Mattress Firm's strategy was to have one store per 80,000 people to garner 40% of the market, the countersuit says.

According to Deitch's countersuit, "Mattress Firm weaponized its real estate department to crush opponents," and its "aggressive roll-up was reckless, resulting in massive clustering of stores."

Moreover, Deitch argues that bribery and gift-giving were part of the company's culture.

"From the top down, it was ingrained in Mattress Firm's culture that its executives and employees could (and should) receive gifts and trips," court filings read.

Deitch's suit also points to the practices of Mattress Firm's parent company, South African retail conglomerate Steinhoff, which bought Mattress Firm at a premium for $3.8 billion in 2016 and is currently the subject of a criminal investigation.

Toward the end of 2017, Steinhoff's stock price tanked by as much as 62% in one day, wiping out $15 billion of its market value after it postponed publishing its full-year accounts, citing "accounting irregularities." Two top executives and its chairman have resigned, and it is now being investigated for fraud.

"The collapse of Steinhoff's value put tremendous pressure on Mattress Firm to seek other avenues than productivity to shore-up its revenues," the countersuit reads.

Steinhoff would not comment on its relationship to Mattress Firm or why it bought the company at a premium.

"As a result of the ongoing investigation, the group has taken a decision not to comment on any past transactions or relationships until we have the results of the forensic investigation," a spokesperson for the company said in a statement emailed to Business Insider.

To hear more about the conspiracy theories around Mattress Firm's stores, listen to "Household Name," a new podcast from Business Insider. Subscribe for free on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or your favorite app.

Source: Pluse ng

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Tech: Amazon just introduced a brand new Echo Dot — it's louder and has a new design, but it's still only $50 (AMZN)

Amazon Echo Dot 2018 new

Amazon's new Echo Dot is $50 and goes on sale Thursday.

Amazon has unveiled a brand-new Echo Dot. The new device costs $50 and will go on sale Thursday.

The retailer says that it's 70% louder than the older model, and sports a new fabric-covered design — a design, it should be noted, that makes it look a lot like the Google Home Mini, the search giant's own rival.

The miniature smart speaker is Amazon's best-selling Echo product, and Amazon says it's the best-selling speaker ever. Amazon unveiled the new device at an event at its headquarters in Seattle.

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APO: Human Settlements Committee to engage Johannesburg Stakeholders on Property Practitioners Bill [B 21—2018]

Republic of South Africa: The Parliament

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The Portfolio Committee on Human Settlements will tomorrow, Friday, 21 September 2018, conclude the first week of its stakeholder engagement meetings Johannesburg.
The objective of the Property Practitioners Bill [B 21—2018] is to provide for the repeal of the Estate Agency Affairs Act of 1976, and make provision for the continuation of the Estate Agency Affairs Board, as the Property Practitioners Regulatory Authority.
The Act is outdated (40 years old) and does not assist government to achieve the outcome of improving the functioning of the property market which includes regulating the buying, selling and renting of land and buildings. The Act in its current form does not assist in meeting the needs of the South African communities and also does not accommodate the dynamic needs of the real estate industry.
The committee is currently in the process of considering the Property Practitioners Bill and will engage various stakeholders to understand the views of the public and enhance Member’s knowledge on the challenges facing the industry.
Details of the meetings are as follows:
Date: Friday, 21 September 2018
Time: 09:00 – 16:00
Venue: Boksburg Customer Area, Banquet Hall, Trichardt street, Boksburg

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Republic of South Africa: The Parliament.
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Sports: The computer model that nailed the NFL's 2017 season has made its picks for Week 3

Ryan Fitzpatrick

Two models predict who will win the games during Week 3 of the NFL season.

  • The computer models are back making their picks for the 2018 NFL season.
  • In 2017, Microsoft's Cortana correctly picked 68% of the games overall and 75% of the games over the final ten weeks.
  • FiveThirtyEight's Elo also had a strong showing during the regular season, correctly picking 64% of the games.


Week 3 of the NFL season is here, and Microsoft's Cortana is back to make picks in a head-to-head showdown with Elo.

We took a look at two popular systems used to pick NFL games: Cortana, Microsoft's digital assistant, and Elo, the modeling system used by Nate Silver's FiveThirtyEight. In both cases, the computers are picking outright winners and not against the spread. However, each gives a likelihood of a team's winning, which, in theory, could help measure the strength of certain lines.

Cortana won the regular season matchup last season, going 162-78 (68%) overall, and 111-38 (75%) over the last ten weeks (we did not track Week 17 because of the wonky nature of the final week). Elo was not far behind, going 154-86 (64%) overall.

Cortana is off to a strong start in 2018, going 10-5-1 in Week 2. Elo struggled, going 7-8-1.

Here are the picks for Week 3, with each model's percent chance of winning in parentheses. Point spreads are just for reference, via Vegas Insider as of Thursday morning.

Thursday

  • New York Jets at Cleveland (-3) — JETS (Elo 62%), BROWNS (Cortana 51%)

Sunday

  • New Orleans at Atlanta (-3) — FALCONS (Elo 66%, Cortana 63%)
  • San Francisco at Kansas City (-6.5) — CHIEFS (Elo 77%, Cortana 60%)
  • Oakland at Miami (-3) — DOLPHINS (Elo 68%, Cortana 63%)
  • Buffalo at Minnesota (-16.5) — VIKINGS (Elo 78%, Cortana 79%)
  • Indianapolis at Philadelphia (-6.5) — EAGLES (Elo 83%, Cortana 66%)
  • Green Bay (-3) at Washington — REDSKINS (Elo 57%), PACKERS (Cortana 53%)
  • Cincinnati at Carolina (-3) — PANTHERS (Elo 63%), BENGALS (Cortana 51%)
  • Tennessee at Jacksonville (no line) — JAGUARS (Elo 71%, Cortana 67%)
  • Denver at Baltimore (-5.5) — RAVENS (Elo 68%, Cortana 63%)
  • New York Giants at Houston (-6) — TEXANS (Elo 59%, Cortana 61%)
  • Los Angeles Chargers at Los Angeles Rams (-7) — RAMS (Elo 64%, Cortana 72%)
  • Chicago (-5.5) at Arizona — CARDINALS (Elo 55%), BEARS (Cortana 66%)
  • Dallas at Seattle (-1.5) — SEAHAWKS (Elo 55%, Cortana 53%)
  • New England (-6.5) at Detroit — PATRIOTS (Elo 64%, Cortana 75%)

Monday

  • Pittsburgh (-1.5) at Tampa Bay — BUCS (Elo 54%), STEELERS (Cortana 57%)

Source: Pluse ng

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Tech: 20 of the most outrageous-looking skyscrapers of all time

Marina Bay Sands hotel is seen at sunset on June 11, 2018 in Singapore.

Skyscrapers have gotten taller, more expensive, and a lot more elaborate over the past few decades. Business Insider has rounded up 20 of the most outrageous-looking towers; some have been in use for years, while others will likely never see the light of day. Take a look.

Skyscrapers have gotten taller, more expensive, and a lot more elaborate over the past few decades.

Some of the most recent designs incorporate wild twists, thousands of plants, and even unattainable features like the ability to hang off an asteroid.

Business Insider has rounded up 20 of the most outrageous-looking towers; some have been in use for years, while others will likely never see the light of day. Take a look below.

A skyscraper in Panama City has one of the tightest twists in the world.

The F&F Tower in Panama City, originally called the Revolution Tower, rotates like a helix.

This tower features one of the tightest twists in the world, turning 5.943 degrees as it rises to a height of about 760 feet. Because the building makes a distinct rotation for each floor, there are four exterior balconies on every level.

Dubai's Burj Al Arab was designed to look like a sail so it wouldn't cover the adjacent beach with its shadow.

The Burj Al Arab overlooks the Persian Gulf on an artificially-made island in Dubai.

It is known for its sail-like shape, which was designed to avoid covering the beach with its shadow, and a platform near the roof was added to serve as a helipad.

The hotel's interior stands out for its luxurious design, with four swimming pools and a private beach club. One of the hotel's restaurants is under the sea; its walls are made of thick acrylic glass to withstand the water pressure, and guests can enter it through a tunnel.

The Marina Bay Sands hotel in Singapore boasts the world's largest infinity pool.

Singapore's Marina Bay Sands is the most Instagrammed hotel in the world.

The five-star resort, which is 57 stories tall, is also home to the highest and longest infinity pool in the world. Marina Bay Sands is made of three columns that are linked at the top by a terrace.

Inside, guests can enjoy designer shopping malls, private movie screens, and several spa facilities.

The Turning Torso twists toward the sky in Malmo, Sweden.

Turning Torso became Sweden's tallest building when it opened in August 2005.

The skyscraper is made of nine five-story pentagons, with each one rotated 90 degrees from the one below to create an optical illusion. The nine pieces, which hold residential units, are connected by a steel exoskeleton that holds the 57-story structure together.

The twisting Evolution Tower in Russia looks like a DNA molecule.

Evolution Tower, located in Moscow, Russia, resembles two ribbons wrapping around each other like a double helix.

The building twists by 3 degrees per floor, with an overall rotation of roughly 135 degrees from base to top. When its design was revealed in 2004, the tower's DNA-shaped design stood out from almost all skyscrapers worldwide.

A Saudi Arabian skyscraper features an inverted parabolic arch.

The Kingdom Centre Tower in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, is a popular spot for business and shopping.

It features an unusual apex with a circular opening, which is frequently seen in nature (like in spiderwebs, for example). A sky bridge — 300 tons of steel and glass — connects the building's two towers.

The tower also features the world's tallest mosque, which is found on the 77th floor. Another part of the building holds a women-only shopping area.

In Osaka, Japan, a skyscraper elevator's glass windows create the impression of flying.

Umeda Sky Building, located in Osaka, Japan, features a "floating garden observatory" that connects its two towers.

Escalators hover between the two towers, sitting diagonally inside a circular hollow.

Movistar's Chilean headquarters resembles a mobile phone from the '90s.

The Torre Telefónica in Santiago, Chile, resembles a mobile phone from the 1990s.

Built in 1993, the 470-foot-tall tower is home to the Chilean headquarters for the phone company Movistar. It was designed to mirror the box phone, which was considered one of the most innovative mobile devices in the early 1990s.

Billionaire Mukesh Ambani lives in a 27-story skyscraper with his family.

The Antilia skyscraper in Mumbai may the world's most extravagant home.

Antilia belongs to business tycoon Mukesh Ambani, the richest man in India, and it towers over the city skyline at 550 feet tall. Six of the house's lowest levels are designated for parking, with the capacity to fit 168 cars, and the lobby holds nine elevators.

Ambani's house also contains a 50-seat home theater and a lap pool, and about 600 staff members work there. The rooftop, in addition to offering a panoramic view of Mumbai, has three helipads.

A new skyscraper in China will feature a 1,000-foot-long "sidescraper" across several towers.

Raffles City in Chongqing, China, was designed to include eight skyscrapers, with a ninth one running horizontally.

Developers proposed the project in 2011, and construction began four years later. As of this summer, six towers have been completed.

The horizontal sky bridge, which resembles a tube, will be 1,000 feet long and include a swimming pool, observatory deck, and retail spaces. The structure is designed by the same firm behind Singapore's Marina Bay Sands hotel.

In Iraq, a group of architects is planning on creating a vertical city of four linked towers.

The 230-story Bride of the Gulf in Iraq is set to become the world's tallest building, but its architects say the main goal is not to break a height record.

Instead, the British-Iraqi architecture firm AMBS aims to create a "vertical city" of four connected towers that could hold offices, hotels, schools, clinics, and more, according to The Guardian. A large canopy would be built over an area at the base of the towers.

A 51-story skyscraper in Singapore will include thousands of plants all over its facade.

A new office tower in Singapore is also set to include thousands of plants in an effort to increase employee productivity and happiness.

The 51-story tower, which broke ground in February, will include a 1 million-square-foot interior with a lot of flora. Plants will also poke out on the lower floors of the facade.

In the middle, tropical vegetation will grow on four different floors, and people will be able to spend time at a jungle gym, treetop cocoons, and in hammocks.

A proposal in Melbourne includes vertical gardens across two towers.

Green Spine, a skyscraper set to be built in Melbourne, Australia, will include two twisting towers and and a hanging garden. The project is still in a very early stage, as the architects announced their plan in August after winning a design competition.

The facade is designed to be self-shading, pointing north and west on the towers' upper faces. As the height increases, the plants go from smaller shrubs to larger trees, and the amount of overshadowing varies to optimize thermal comfort and noise absorption for residents.

A Greek architect has created a design for a super-skinny, U-shaped tower in New York.

Greek architect Ioannis Oikonomou wants to build a U-shaped skyscraper just south of New York City's Central Park.

In 2017, the architect told Business Insider that he has sent the design to developers and is seeking investment.

The tower, called "Big Bend," would measure about 4,000 feet from one end of the U to the other. Big Bend's peak would be roughly 200 feet taller than One World Trade Center.

If built, Tokyo's Sky Mile Tower would be twice as tall as the world's current tallest building.

Sky Mile Tower was designed to rise as high as 420 stories above Tokyo Bay.

In 2016, Kohn Pederson Fox Associates and Leslie E. Robertson Associates announced plans for the skyscraper as part of a larger proposal called "Next Tokyo 2045," though no funding has been announced yet.

If it is built, the skyscraper would be a mainly residential space, housing about 55,000 people. The proposal, created with rising sea levels and typhoon risks in mind, calls for the tower to be surrounded by rings that would break up strong waves. The surrounding waters would also feature farm plots floating around.

Multi-level sky lobbies would link different residential spaces, giving residents access to shared amenities like gyms, libraries, and shops.

One skyscraper design calls for a building coated in self-cleaning material that eats smog.

Materials science company Arconic wants to build a three-mile-high skyscraper with smog-eating surfaces and retractable balconies.

EcoClean, released in 2011, is a special coating that helps purify the air and keep buildings clean. The material relies on light and water vapor, which mix with the chemicals in its coating to create free radicals. These atoms take pollutants from the air and break them down, removing them from the building's surface along with dirt.

In addition, Arconic wants to include motorized windows that can converts into all-glass balconies in less than one minute.

In 2017, a company spokesperson told Business Insider that Arconic has showcased this technology at various trade shows around the world and expects to hit the market in the "near future." No word on when the skyscraper will be built, however.

The winner of eVolo's 2017 design competition wants to build a skyscraper with a vertical farm that could feed a whole town.

The design magazine eVolo holds an annual design competition for skyscraper ideas, and last year's winner, the Mashambas skyscraper, involves a vertical farm tower large enough to feed a town in sub-Saharan Africa.

Mashambas, designed by Polish architects Pawel Lipiński and Mateusz Frankowski, would include fertilizer and seeds, and produce would be grown on the highest floors. The remaining levels would include classrooms, a doctor's office, and a docking area for drones to bring food to hard-to-reach places.

Farmers would be able to sell their crops at an open-air market on the ground floor. In addition, the designers want part of the tower to be made of modular pieces that can be taken apart and brought elsewhere.

A trio of Polish architects won an international design award for a foldable skyscraper.

At this year's eVolo design competition, a trio of Polish architects took first place for proposing a skyscraper for disaster areas.

Skyshelter.zip is a lightweight tower that could be airlifted to a location by three helicopters. Its assembly would not require a construction crew, as it would only take a few minutes to unfurl the structure into place.

According to the proposal, the tower would include temporary housing, storage, a medical facility, and a vertical farm. As of now, there are no concrete plans to build the skyscraper.

Some designs are very unrealistic. A New York design firm wants a skyscraper to hang from an asteroid more than 31,000 miles above Earth.

The Analemma Tower would be powered by solar panels, which would constantly be exposed to sunlight.

Each day, the tower would travel thousands of miles in a figure-of-eight loop between the Northern and Southern hemispheres. This is, as you might imagine, impossible.

A group of architects wants to build skyscrapers inside hollowed-out Giant Sequoia trees.

Four South Korean architects believe that Giant Sequoia trees, which are native to California's Sierra Nevada, would make a great home for skyscrapers.

The average Giant Sequoia tree is anywhere from 150 to 280 feet tall. The architects — Ko Jinhyeuk, Cheong Changwon, Cho Kyuhyung, and Choi Sunwoong — received an honorable mention at eVolo's 2017 design competition for a proposal to design towers inside hollowed-out Giant Sequoia trees.

Each story of the tower would be added gradually, and the skyscrapers would include research labs on environmental preservation, classrooms, a gallery space, and more. There are currently no plans to actually build such a tower.

Source: Pluse ng

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Husband surrenders himself to police after stabbing wife (graphic photo)

A man has surrendered himself to the police after stabbing his wife.Ricks Kameza, 30, stabbed his 25-year-old wife, Brenda Kapyola, multiple times, leaving her badly injured. The incident happened on September 19, 2018, in Sitima,T/A Mlumbe, Malawi.The couple have been married for almost 5 years and blessed with a daughter named Sandra Kameza, 4. The husband works in South Africa and while there, he got news that his wife was engaging in extramarital affairs. He reportedly returned home to Malawi in June 2018 to resolve the issue. The matter was brought before marriage councillors to resolve but failed because a knife was found hidden under the pillow of the wife. When asked about the knife, the man said it will be used on his wife. This destroyed any chances of reconciliation.  The husband is reported to have left their home but came days later to collect his passport and beg for forgiveness which the wife rejected. On September 16, 2018, the wife lodged a complaint at Thondwe Police with victim support unit. Two days later, the matter was resolved in favour of the wife who opted for divorce but the husband refused. Then on Wednesday, September 19, the husband came home at night and climbed into the compound through the fence. He broke one of the windows to gain entrance into the house where he found his wife and hacked her with a knife.  Neighbours heard the wife's screams and came to her rescue while the husband ran away. He later surrendered himself to the police.The woman is in a critical condition in a hospital while the suspect is in custodyThe post Husband surrenders himself to police after stabbing wife (graphic photo) appeared first on Linda Ikeji Blog.
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Malabu Oil Scam: Nigerian consultant, Italian get 4 years jail term over controversial oil deal

Both companies deny paying kickbacks

A Nigerian and an Italian, who were both negotiators during the sale of controversial OPL 245 aka Malabu deal, have been jailed four years each.

A Nigerian consultant in England, Emeka Obi, and his Italian partner, Gianluca Di Nardo, who stood as middlemen in the controversial Malabu oil deal have been jailed.

According to a report by Reuters, Obi and Di Nardo were found guilty and sentenced four years each by an Italian court on Thursday, September 20, 2018.

It was further reported that Obi and Di Nardo had opted for a quick trial for their roles in the deal.

ALSO READ: Italy Supreme Court stops Shell from halting Malabu Oil trial

The Malabu deal is the controversial sale of OPL 245 oil block in offshore Nigerian waters.

The Malabu deal became a subject of legal redress after it was struck in 2011 under President Goodluck Jonathan.

Royal Dutch Shell and Italian Agip-Eni allegedly paid out about $1.1 billion to Dan Etete, a former Nigerian petroleum minister who had previously been convicted of money laundering in France.

ALSO READ: Shell knew about bribery involved in Malabu deal – Watchdogs

Eni denies wrongdoing in Malabu oil scandal

Italian giant Eni said it was "serene" in the face of allegations it had bribed Nigerian officials to seal an oil deal, insisting the company was squeaky clean.

 

"The company is serene and has the utmost confidence in the management," its chairman Emma Marcegaglia told shareholders at the group's general assembly in Rome.

Eni and fellow petroleum Goliath Shell are accused of corruption in the 2011 purchase of OPL245, an offshore oil block estimated to hold 9 billion barrels of crude, for $1.3 billion.

Both companies are charged with corruption in Nigeria and are being investigated by Italian prosecutors in connection with the deal, which allegedly saw Nigeria's former president Goodluck Jonathan and his oil minister pocket bribes.

'My real role in Malabu oil deal,' Ex-AGF Adoke

Former attorney-general of the federation, Mohammed Adoke, has denied he brokered the controversial OPL 245 deal between the federal government and Malabu Oil and Gas in 2011.

Adoke said he did not broker the deal, but admitted playing the role of a "facilitator" on behalf of the Federal Government.

In a statement issued by his media officer, Victor Akhidenor, the ex-AGF also said he did not receive bribe from anyone regarding the deal.

The statement was in reaction to a newspaper editorial which named Adoke as the leader of the team that brokered the deal.

Source: Pluse ng

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Sports: Everyone wants to ‘fix’ baseball, but almost no one is talking about one simple solution

Aaron Judge.

These days, everyone's got a hot take on how to "fix" Major League Baseball. These suggestions all seem to be aimed at a crowd that MLB wants to appeal to — people who are not currently interested in baseball games.

  • Everyone is trying to "fix" Major League Baseball.
  • There are seemingly endless suggestions for what to do.
  • The real solution? Expand the postseason.

These days, everyone's got a hot take on how to "fix" Major League Baseball.

There's the proposed "catch-up rule," forcing relief pitchers to face at least three hitters, shortening the season, lowering the costs of concessions and tickets, and cutting the game from nine to seven innings, among many, many other suggestions that mostly amount to speeding up the game at all costs.

These suggestions all seem to be aimed at a crowd that MLB wants to appeal to — people who are not currently interested in baseball games.

But what if MLB made a change aimed at people who are interested in baseball, enjoy watching the games, or are loyal followers of one of its 30 teams? You know, the people who most frequently spend their money on its product.

This change would provide as many as ten MLB cities each year with an increase in meaningful games fans will shell out money to watch. It would, in all likelihood, give the league a larger television audience. It would give fans a reason to stay engaged longer into the season. And it wouldn't necessitate unneeded tinkering with the on-field product.

It's time for baseball to expand its postseason.

There are religious followers of the game who cringe at the thought. They feel it cheapens the regular season, rewarding teams who haven't played well enough to deserve the opportunity for a World Series. But as we can see from past baseball postseason expansions — this isn't true. People aren't arguing that one of the Wild Card teams to win a World Series — such as the San Francisco Giants in 2014 or Florida Marlins in 2003 — were undeserving.

As it stands right now, baseball has each of its "Wild Card" games taking place during the first week of October. If the league expanded its playoffs from five to eight teams in each league, this round would be replaced with a first round, three-game series featuring each of the eight participants. It would work the same way this playoff format does in hockey and basketball — the best team plays the lowest-ranked team and so on.

And this change wouldn't cause any significant lengthening of the already long baseball season. You're looking at adding an extra three to four days onto the baseball calendar.

How it would work

This entry series would just be a best-of-three. The lower-ranked team would host the first game at home while the higher-ranked team would get to have the second game and the potential winner-take-all third game at home. Following that first round, the baseball playoffs would continue under the current format of a five-game series followed by two seven-game series.

For those who think this would cheapen the product, consider this: The current playoff model is much more unfair and routinely rewards teams that underperformed others.

In 2015, the Pittsburgh Pirates had the second-best record in all of baseball. The only team with a better record, however, happened to be their National League Central Division rivals, the St. Louis Cardinals. Meanwhile, the team with the third-best record in baseball was the Chicago Cubs, the third-place team in the NL Central. That meant that the second- and third-best teams in the sport had to play a one-game, winner take all playoff just to get into the main postseason bracket. Meanwhile, the New York Mets and Los Angeles Dodgers — who were at least five and six games worse than the Cubs and Pirates, respectively — got a free ride into the Division Series.

Something similar is happening this year. In the American League, the New York Yankees and Oakland A's are each on pace to win nearly 100 games. But because the Boston Red Sox and Houston Astros have played historically good baseball, the Yankees and A's will have to clash in a one-game playoff. The loser will see their season of great baseball rewarded with just one game. For the A's, that likely means no playoff home games in exchange for a 95+ win season should they lose to the Bronx Bombers.

Meanwhile, a Cleveland Indians team will be rewarded with a free ride onto the second round with a record that will, in all likelihood, be much inferior to the Yankees and A's. And even at that, their winning percentage is a product of playing in baseball's worst division with three atrocious teams and another that is merely bad. The Indians are 40-43 when playing teams outside of their historically lousy division. Inside of it, the team is 45-23.

How it would change the course of MLB's bizarre 2018 season

Because the AL has been so unbalanced all year — five teams have been locked into playoff positions for much of the summer — the regular season has essentially proven meaningless for months. In both Tampa and Seattle, teams will likely finish with more than 90 wins — often considered the bar to make the playoffs — only to miss the postseason entirely. Owners of baseball's third-best record since July, the Rays will get no reward for impressively cruising through the season's second half.

But if MLB expanded the playoffs, Tampa and Seattle would be playing critical games to determine what slot they fell into for the postseason's first round. The final spot in the AL this year would go to the Los Angeles Angels — who happen to have the league's brightest star in outfielder Mike Trout. Trout, however, has been to the postseason just once in his eight professional seasons.

And baseball wonders why he isn't as marketable as the big stars in other sports.

Meanwhile, the National League, a playoff expansion would mean that teams in Philadelphia, Arizona, Pittsburgh, and Washington would be fighting tooth-and-nail right now to clinch one of the postseason's final two slots. That's four cities that would gain meaningful September baseball — a likely increase in attendance and viewership — as opposed to the seemingly unimportant games in which each team has been competing.

Then, think of the dramatic first round of games the league could provide fans under a 16-team system. It would be creating a March Madness-esque playoff atmosphere during the first week in October, where playoff games all across the country took place from early in the afternoon all the way through the night. It would create a scenario where underdog teams could emerge victorious over heavy favorites — something baseball is seemingly void of in its postseason as it stands today.

It would create a fairer postseason, provide more fans with meaningful, late-season baseball, inject an underdog element currently missing from baseball's playoffs, and wouldn't require any controversial tinkering with the on-field product.

Baseball faced some pushback when it expanded the postseason in 1969 and again after the 1994 strike. Would it choose to return to those smaller postseason fields? No. And the sport would have no interest in going back to the present-day scenario if it goes through with this adjustment.

Source: Pluse ng

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Lifestyle: Tesla Model 3 scores 5-star safety rating from NHTSA (TSLA)

Tesla's Model 3.

Tesla's Model 3 received a five-star rating in the frontal crash, side crash, and rollover categories, and some of its driver assistance features — like forward collision warning, lane departure warning, crash imminent braking, and dynamic brake support — met the agency's performance tests.

Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

  • The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has given the Tesla Model 3 sedan a five-star overall safety rating, the highest score the agency can give.
  • The Model 3 received a five-star rating in the frontal crash, side crash, and rollover categories, and some of its driver assistance features — like forward collision warning, lane departure warning, crash imminent braking, and dynamic brake support — met the agency's performance tests.
  • Tesla's prior two vehicles, the Model S sedan and Model X SUV, also received five-star safety ratings from the NHTSA.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has given the Tesla Model 3 sedan a five-star overall safety rating, the highest score the agency can give.

The Model 3 received a five-star rating in the frontal crash, side crash, and rollover categories, and some of its driver assistance features — like forward collision warning, lane departure warning, crash imminent braking, and dynamic brake support — met the agency's performance tests.

Tesla's prior two vehicles, the Model S sedan and Model X SUV, also received five-star safety ratings from the NHTSA.

Some of the Model 3's safety features have also been evaluated by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, which gave the vehicle a "superior" rating in the "front crash prevention" category ("superior" is the highest rating in that category) and an "acceptable" rating for its headlights ("acceptable" is the second-highest rating in that category), and found its automatic braking system to be overly cautious. The organization has not yet rated the safety of the vehicle's other features, like its sides, roof, and seats.

The Model 3 is Tesla's first mass-market vehicle, though the company has not yet sold its $35,000 base priced version. While the vehicle has been praised by reviewers, it has also been subject to production delays and reports of inconsistent quality.

Tesla's semi-autonomous driver assistance feature, Autopilot, has come under scrutiny from the National Transportation Safety Board. The agency is investigating multiple crashes involving the feature, which Tesla has said makes its vehicles safer.

Tesla has pointed to statistics that link Autopilot with lower accident and fatality rates and said it has made clear to customers that they must be alert when using the system. Critics say Tesla's favorite statistics don't isolate Autopilot's effect on safety and argue that, despite Tesla's warnings, the system breeds complacency in drivers who eventually place too much faith in it.

Have a Tesla news tip? Contact this reporter at mmatousek@businessinsider.com.

Source: Pluse ng

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Politics: Paddlers are so mad Trump's visits to his Virginia golf course keep shutting down the Potomac River that they're suing the administration

Trump National Golf Club Sterling, Virginia

A group of paddlers who frequent along the Potomac River in Maryland are suing President Donald Trump and his administration for his frequent golf course visits shutting down the river.

  • A group of paddlers who frequent along the Potomac River in Maryland are suing President Donald Trump and his administration.
  • They are angry that his frequent golf course visits are shutting down the river, the Washingtonian reported Thursday.
  • The Canoe Cruisers Association of Greater Washington filed a lawsuit in Maryland accusing the administration of failing to notify residents and surrounding businesses of a policy that prevented them from using part of the river.

A group of paddlers are suing President Donald Trump and his administration for his frequent golf course visits shutting down the Potomac River, the Washingtonian reported Thursday.

The Canoe Cruisers Association of Greater Washington filed a lawsuit in Maryland accusing the administration of failing to notify residents and surrounding businesses of a policy that prevented them from using part of the river.

The fight between paddlers and the Trump White House has been going on since the US Coast Guard implemented a temporary shutdown of the river next to Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Virginia last summer, according to the report. The 1.6-mile stretch is roughly 30 minutes upriver from Washington.

The lawsuit specifically mentions Karl L. Schultz, who is the commandant of the Coast Guard, and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, the Washingtonian reported.

It says that the Coast Guard's policy prevents the public from legally enjoying this specific area of the river when Trump was ever at his golf club. It also alleges that DHS, under the leadership of Nielsen, ignored over 600 public comments from individuals who were negatively impacted by the policy.

"The ball's been in their court for over a year," attorney Nitin Shaw told the Washingtonian. "We hope with this lawsuit they certainly do what is right and reverse this rule to accommodate the very serious ramifications on the paddling community."

Source: Pluse ng

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